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cR "Scenarios"

Discussion in 'Learner League' started by adr1an, Apr 28, 2009.

  1. adr1an
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    adr1an <font style="color:red;">Administrator</font> Administrator

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    Im creating this thread because I thought it might be a good idea. Maybe we should make it a sub-forum so each scenario can have its own thread ? It might go somewhere, it might not.. totally depends on if anyone's interested.

    As motorcyclists, I think one of the best things we tend to do (more so than average 'car' drivers at least) is self-analyse and also seek better risk-management techniques. Quite often though, these tips or 'lessons learned' can be hard to grasp without perhaps seeing how it applied, or lots of the time, wasn't applied.

    Lots of the time, its just hard to see how some of them would even be relevant to you, until someone relates a story of how appropriate it indeed is.

    So I think it would be good if we could all start maybe sharing some of these Scenarios that we have been exposed to, how we at the time handled it, what we learned from it and how we would perhaps approach it differently.

    Im putting this into Learner League, because A: I think it would be beneficial perhaps for the newer riders amongst us and B: I'd ask that everyone try and keep this thread at least a little serious ;)

    I've done one below, based on an experience this morning as an example. I'll also put up a scenario that didn't have such a positive end. So if you have had near-misses, or off's, then try and outline it vaguely like I did so people can both see what happened and what potentially you have learned from it. Other people then should feel free to comment or add other aspects that perhaps should be considered.
     
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  2. adr1an
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    adr1an <font style="color:red;">Administrator</font> Administrator

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    Scenario:
    Vehicle without warning entered onto road verge

    Techniques Applied:
    Swerve aviodance, Emergency Braking, Swearing

    Location:
    Glenloch Interchange

    Weather: Light Rain, Low Visibility

    Description:
    The past few weeks has seen some increase in work around this part of the interchange again, mainly Surveyors with private vehicles, mainly adjacent to the Arboretium entrance.
    Consequently, I have also been trying to pay attention to both the traffic and workers and their locations.

    I was travelling Northbound in the Right-hand lane through Glenloch Interchange on Tuggeranong Parkway.
    As I take the City Exit, and to avoid issues with merging traffic from the left from Lady Denman Dr, I often travel in the left wheel-track of the right lane.
    I also generally travel covering both my clutch and brakes along here.

    Coming past the point of 'reasonable merging' (about 10m's before the various lanes are 'commited' to their exits) I then again moved across to the right wheel track, with a minivan in the left lane heading onto the GDE.
    I had just done this and commenced a normal scan (speed, warning lights, both mirrors) when I noticed something moving in the bushes ahead, to the right of where the city lane starts swinging away.
    About 40-50Ms away
    As I came to focus on this, I had already started moving slightly to the left and setup the front-brake...
    Just in time to see an early-90's model landcruiser shoot out of the bushes and onto the parkway, almost perpendicular to my lane and blocking nearly 2/3rds of it!

    As I was already halfway through the setup-n-squeeze scenario already before I even realised WTF was happening, I had scrubbed a lot of the ~90K's I was travelling at.
    The two guys suddenly noticed me and lurched to a stop (passengers arms waving in the cabin), leaving just over a metre or so of my 'lane' left. The minivan next to me had also slowed by this stage but was still next to me, giving me not much room to move.

    Releasing some pressure off the front, I swerved left in my lane sharply and swiftly and fairly clamly managed to go between the front of the 4WD and the side of the minivan.

    Lots of head shaking, swearing in the helmet ensued.

    Lessons Learned or Re-affirmed:
    Always cover your brakes near on-ramps and off-ramps.
    Practice Emergency Braking. It was wet out there today, and it really really helps to know what to expect and how much you can hope to achieve on any particular bike.
    Collision Avoidance Swerves. And I dont mean huge-cone-weave-s-bends. Short-sharp quick-steers to change lane position - just like in the P's Test...
    Horns on bikes are useless - just take evasive action, even if its over-compensating the situation ! :)
     
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  3. Stormrider
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    Stormrider Member

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    Idiots in Landcruisers, doh!!!!!
     
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  4. Dids
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    Dids Member Veteran Member

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    This is an excellent idea. In fact, if people are willing to take a little positive criticism, every cR off should be up here. As we share, we learn.

    Here's one of mine which involved extreme pucker factor:

    Scenario: Travelling north up highway. Car oncoming @ 300m, road train following. Road flat.
    Weather: Hot, sunny, clear.
    Time: About 8am.

    Techniques: Observation, Narration, braking (are these even techniques? S'pose narration/braking are).

    At around 400m out, road train pours smoke from the the stacksand pulls out from behind car. Estimate that the car cannot be overtaken before my arrival, road train will be in my lane, head-on with a semi is about to happen. Fortunately, I had a small amount of time to think (fast). Closure speed was around 260km/h. Immediately pulled on brakes, then realised that this will reduce gyroscopic effect of tyres and wind stability, leaving me subject to massive buffeting and turbulence from the semi as it passes. Applied power and increased speed to 130km/h - which would seem insane.

    Started talking to myself. Arms in. Knees in. Get in behind the screen. Hunch down. LOOK AT WHERE YOU WANT TO GO! DO NOT LOOK AT THE TRUCK. LOOK AT THE ROAD. LOOK AT THE ROAD!! Remember to apply the rear brake to try and keep the bike in a line.

    At the last minute, I glanced up at the truckie. He was waving at me. I huckered down for the buffeting from the truck. There was a bit, but it would have been a lot worse had I slowed right down.
     
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  5. adr1an
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    adr1an <font style="color:red;">Administrator</font> Administrator

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    Thanks guys for sharing so far ! :up

    Craig: I've had similar experiences. The natural reaction is to 'hesitate' for a minute then slow - which as you said can leave you in a worse situation.

    Jase: Its a common thing, that 'relaxing' after the high-speed runs. I must admit Im quite prone to it myself - especially when coming off of a 'hot run' through some twisties... Its when everyone sort of natural feels like they have reduced 'their' risk in having slowed down, forgetting that the surronding 'ambient risks' (such as traffic, potholes, obstacles etc) are at the same constant.. and its lead to many 'oopsies' like yours.
    It is also funny just how true that 'when in doubt - power out' actually is !
     
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  6. Nerf
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    Scenario:
    Work ute carrying approx 10 large plywood sheets on roof racks.

    Techniques Applied:
    NEVER FOLLOW A VEHICLE CARRYING A LOAD

    Location:
    Monaro Highway, northbound nearing Fyshwick

    Weather: Clear, sunny

    Description:
    Approached ute from behind at about 110 Km/Hr, he was doing 100 going in same direction. I saw he had a load of sheeting on board and decided to get the phuck out from behind him. Changed lanes and passed him, as I was passing him the top sheet lifted off, flew up about 5 meters in the air and slid backwards quickly into relative location where I had just been riding. It would have taken my head off, no problem.

    The sheet flew back into the traffic following and caused chaos. Dumbass driver was not even aware what he had caused so I signalled him to pull over and told him toget back and sort out the shit he had caused.

    Moral of the story: Never follow a ute, car with trailer, truck or van carrying a load externally. Shit happens, don't let it happen to you.
     
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  7. adr1an
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    adr1an <font style="color:red;">Administrator</font> Administrator

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    Bit of a long one.. probably because I took a fair bit away from it personally and have also spent a long time recalling the entire set of events. So much background as well because there was a number of screwed up thoughts going on that started way back before I even got near the bike. I am also to this day amazed at how out of it I was. At the time I had no idea that I was so effected - its only in hindsight.

    I've just re-read what I've typed and realise its hellishly long - but screw it...Its actually the first time I've really ever typed it all out properly... im posting it anyway :rockon

    Scenario:
    Sudden and violent traction loss just past corner apex followed by tank-slapper(*).

    Techniques Applied:
    Power Out, The Lords Prayer

    Location:
    Suburbia, Sydney

    Weather:
    Bright and Sunny from what I saw and recall of it...

    Description:
    It was August 16th, 2002. I'd just returned late the night before from a flight in from Canada where I'd been for just over the past 4 weeks. I got to sleep that morning about 4am and then woke up about 11am. I wandered down stairs and had made most of a coffee when I recalled I had no milk in the house still. The local shop was located maybe 750M's from my house on another street - well within walking distance.
    Not having ridden for over a month, I decide - screw it - I'll ride up! (First Mistake).
    Grabbing my boots and a backpack,I opted to go as I was already dressed in just jeans and a jumper as I had already poured my coffee and intending to go literally around the corner (Second personal mistake of the day).
    In fact I didn't even grab my wallet - I just had cash in my pocket. (Third mistake of the day).

    To get to the shop I simply had to go up the street 500m's, turn left and ride another 250m's, stopping on the footpath outside.
    After completing my transaction, because of a no-right-turn restriction back into my street, I had to go around the block to my house - completing a full block around my house.

    I did my usual hard accelerate off the footpath onto the sidestreet , cleared the gutter and headed down the road slightly - literally only 3 houses down - to where I take a left hand turn to get me back towards my house. Its a slight downhill off-camber turnin to this street but it was always kinda fun and I knew it well having taken it near everyday for 4 years.
    Tipping into it at what was a very reasonable pace I had just finished clearing the apex when the back-end stepped out suddenly to the right [later discovered through investigation to be because of leaking diesel from a nearby parked truck].
    The back end felt like it was almost right round and I just kept the throttle open thinking "oh shit oh shit" combined with "dont close dont close". Somehow I managed to hold it open and regain composure enough for it to come back straight - I thought. Due to the almost wide-open-throttle situation I was now in and the increase rate of travel in a narrowish laneway, and believing it to be done with, I shut the throttle. (Fifth mistake of the day).

    From here is where I have constantly tussled with the accident itself. For reasons I can't work out, about half a second after shutting the throttle, the bike started to develop an ever increasingly violent tank slapper. It was my raceprepped R6, and it did twitch a little under acceleration, ran diff suspension etc (but no damper), but it never had done this coming *off* the throttle. To this day, I cannot explain why it did this, nor why it did it so violently. And the bike was so badly damaged subsequent the crash no one could ever determine why either. But it still plays on my mind as to why the hell it did it. And how I should have got out of it. I still wonder if I should have just gassed it the hell back up again, lifted the front, and hoped....

    The slapper continued to get more and more violent and by this stage I was now heading uncontrollably towards a rather steep gutter. We are talking lock-to-lock at this stage.

    I conciously recall thinking, looking down in that 'crash-time slowmotion' that happens, and watching the bars slapping and my naked arms and hands and thinking as I mentally prepared to bail off "ahh shit.. I dont even have gloves on..".
    Shortly there after the bars got ripped out of my hands so I bailed off the right hand side of the bike rather violently into the road, landing on my right hand side and then continuing over and cartwheeling into the gutter, doing at least another 3 rolls along the gutter in various directions based on my helmets damage.

    Ended up there upside down head first in the gutter lying there for what seemed a good 10 seconds. after a moment I did the standard "is everything still attached and mobile check" and amazingly all my arms and legs seemed to be there and felt not broken. I rather woozily stood up and was very very disorientated for a minute. It took me a good while to figure out which direction I was facing, where I was relative to everything. I removed my helmet clumsily - my fingers didn't quite work. Very dazed I looked up and down the road for my bike and couldn't find it. Then I spotted it over in some blokes front yard probably about 30 metres further down the road.

    I sort of staggered/hobbled down to it and picked it up off its side - I could see the screen was gone , headlights smashed and tank was a total-loss as well. Putting it on its stand, I walked back a bit and started to take a better look at the thing. Something wasn't right.. I couldn't put my finger on it though...

    At this stage a guy came running up towards me from a house saying "are you okay mate" and looking *very* pale "I've called an ambulance and they will be here soon".
    Ah shit I think. This is NSW - home of the compulsory Neg-Riding. Woot.
    "Nah nah, Im fine mate, I'll just pop down the medical centre"
    "I dont think so - you need the hospital"
    "nah - its ok - I'll be right..." I said to him as I start doing my first proper personal damage assesment. Looking down at my hands, which were now burning like buggery, I saw I actually had no skin on either my palms or most of my fingers. I'd the nails off of a couple of digits too. My right elbow was visible - as in my bone, and I had road rash all down the arms and across onto the back of the right hand. As I'd bailed off, I must have caught the rear pillion pegs, as I had a large puncture wound into gash in my right calf, and most of my right leg was road rashed. I also had deep rash across my lower back below where my backpack (empty bar carton of milk thankgod) hadn't acted as protection.

    I looked back at the bike again, hearing the distance sirens approaching, and then it struck me. The entire subframe was gone, snapped off. I'd sat there and picked my bike up and spent another few minutes next to it before I even realised the entire rear of the bike was some 10M's away...

    I started going into really bad shock at this stage as all the adrenaline had worn off just as the ambo's pulled up. They took one look at me, threw me on a gurney with neck brace and put me straight on the "green whistle".
    I thankfully was also able to pursuade them to go rather urgently via my house first so they could both lock it, get my wallet and some details of next-of-kin then get me to A&E. From there on it was a 2 week hospital stay followed by 8 weeks of twice weekly out-patient visits for dressing changes.

    Lessons Learned or Re-affirmed:
    Never ride unless you are 100% with it. I was jet lagged and making "giddy" decisions being able to ride again.
    Never be complacent, even on corners you intimately know. Conditions change.
    Personally always wear at least jacket and gloves.. (This was a personal lesson and decision subsequent. I didn't enjoy the experience. Its not a moral statement to anyone else.)
    It doesn't really matter how fast your are going or how close to home you are - shit happens. (this off started at the lowest speed of any of my 'offs' yet caused me the most damage - personally and to the bike).
    Never trust your own judgement after a crash - its usual crap and highly misguided. Seek medical assistance.
    Keep contact numbers handy in your wallet with desciptions for others to make sense of. And always carry your wallet.
    Get Ambulance coverage if your health care doesn't cover it! (my <15km taxi fare was $352..)

    (*) For readers not entirely sure of what a 'tank slapper' is... its the violent shaking of the bars - and not just a little flutter.. (although some would call that a 'tank slapper' ;) )... but full lock-to-lock uncontrollable oscillation of the handlebars. The best thing I can do - is show you what it is :D
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2010
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  8. jrad
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    jrad Member

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    I totally disagree on this point though you make some very valid points as well.

    Now up to 250,000kms on the road after 10+years and I can honestly say the horn has saved me as many times as I've had to perform evasive action.

    I'm not saying either/or - I'm just saying the horn can be a life saver as well - ride without it for a week and see how you feel.....

    Scenario: Driver is changing lanes, no indication, no headcheck.

    You know the driver has not done the headcheck cause you should be watching the drivers head and actions, not indicators etc so you'll see them merging into your lane or at least you should see them and you could either swerve/accelerate but there's been many a time whereby I was able to hit the horn and avoid any problems.

    At the same time, you should be setting up, ready to squeeze, and making sure no matter what option you pick that you've given yourself and 'out' option so not disagreeing with everything Adr1an has written - but as far as 'horns being useless' I take exception to this........esp when aimed at less experienced/new riders.
     
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  9. adr1an
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    adr1an <font style="color:red;">Administrator</font> Administrator

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    You are right jrad.
    What I was trying to impart, for just as many times I've gone to hit the horn I've also ended up taking evasive action. Indeed sometimes a quick-toot has helped avoid a situation - but when its actually come to the crunch - I've found the couple of seconds spent hitting the horn and hoping for a reaction was often better spent avoiding the entire scenario. In fact - the scenario you outlined above happened just the other afternoon - and I did go for the toot because I was actually a good decent distance back anyway - it was more of a "oi - dickhead" toot... All this managed to do was get the driver to start looking around as he continued to move across into my lane - and that I have found is a common occurence (a horn alerts them to a danger, but doesn't actually stop them proceeding on their way...)

    My statement was perhaps way to over generalised, and indeed shouldn't be taken as a "dont ever bother about it"... More of a statement that a horn can help, but If Im at the point I need to use the Horn *for my safety*, *personally* Im generally also thinking Im better off not being there - be it braking, swerving, accelerating, whatever the particular 'out' im carrying at the time is.. In a car, you can lay on the horn and let 'justice' sort it out within the confines of a metal cage... but on the bike.. I prefer to just not be there.

    So yes - Horns are not "useless" as I said - they are in fact handy to have.. but I dont ever consider using it as part of my "Safety Armoury" - its more of a 'heads up' than a 'get the f outta my way'.... consider it a motorcylists version of "Discretion is the better part of Valor" :D :D
     
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  10. Bogan
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    Bogan Member

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    Scenario:
    Vehicle came around a 90 degree unsighted corner the wrong way down a one way street as I was tipping in.

    Techniques Applied:
    Crash into font of car, smack handlebars with shins, land on bonnet and end up on ground.

    Location:
    Kirrawee NSW

    Weather:
    Sunny

    Description:
    I was turning left at low speed, and had just tipped in when the car came around the corner going against the legal road direction. I maintain to this day that there was nothing I could reasonably have been expected to do to avoid the accident.

    Didn't stop the little nerd from attempting to weasel out of it via his dad saying that he was now "...denying liability for the accident". A letter of demand was promptly typed (it was the 80s) and posted.

    A couple of days later I got a phone call saying that they had a cheque ready. He was after all going the wrong way in a one way street.

    I could have got the bike towed (front guard was bent up onto the tyre) or gone to hospital for a shin checkup, automatically involving the police on the scene, but I didn't.

    It all worked out in the end though after I got two quotes and sent a formal letter of demand. I was uninsured on my little learner 250cc shitter and they probably thought they'd try it on.

    Lessons Learned or Re-affirmed:
    Processes work in this scenario, and I was reimbursed for the damage caused to my motorcycle.

    Get details, phone numbers, addresses, and witnesses where possible to any accident.
     
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  11. MickLC
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    MickLC Member

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    +1 which was how I ended up nearly rear ending a bike that slowed down unexpectedly to wait for the others to catch up when we went from bitumen to dirt. I swerved to avoid him and ended up parking the bike upright in a big pile of dirt and tree roots on the side of the road :blush
     
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  12. Patrick
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    This is something that happened to me on a dirt road some years ago. While the majority here are roadies this lesson certainly applies to all types of riding. (and while many would see it as a bit of common sense, its always something we can need remind of)

    Scenario:
    Vehicle parked on side of road moves to cross the road in front of you at short notice/distance.

    Techniques Applied:
    Front brake, and too much of it.

    Location:
    Khancoben cattle station.

    Weather:
    Cloudy, but plenty of visibility.

    Description:
    I had been staying with a mate at the Khancoben cattle station (his dad was managing it at the time) and both he and myself had been riding our small bore bikes around the place.
    One of our regular loops was up the long, dirt driveway and back. Along this driveway a tractor was parked on the side of the road. It had
    been there since i got there (4 days prior) and i was used to seeing it there as i came down the slight hill and around the gentle bend.

    However on such a ride back down the driveway, as i neared the tractor, it shifted suddenly (someone had gotten in it to move it) and as i was very near to it (roughly 40 meters) i panicked and hit the front brakes as i saw the tractor start to move towards the road, fearing a collision. And as many of us will know, when you hit the front brakes suddenly, your either going to go flying over the bars or your front end is going to wash out.

    So as you would of guessed hitting the front brakes full on, on a dirt road the front of the bike slipped out fro under me and i went down, copping a rather nasty blow off the handle bars in the chest.
    I was fine, badly winded and bruised but i walked away no problems.

    Lessons Learned or Re-affirmed:
    - All though it can take a few near misses/accidents to get a hang of this, panicking is one of the worst things you can do when a situation goes bad.
    If something goes afoul while your riding, your chances of getting out unharmed/less harmed are greatly improved if you can remain calm and in control. When you panic, a great deal of your skill and experience on a bike goes out the window, and often when you panic, your going to freeze up, which makes turning to avoid something very difficult.
    After my off in the above scenario, it was obviously apparent to me that had i kept my head about me i would of easily slowed down and moved out to the other side of the road.

    - Proper braking is a very important thing to get a hang of when you start riding. To much of either front or rear brake can cause the bike to go either way from under you, and is also drastically affected on wet/dirt roads. As it differs from bike to bike, every time you buy a new bike its a good idea to set yourself up in a car park and get a feel for the brakes and work on a technique that's going to slow you down the fastest without coming back to bite you on the ass.
    Many riders have various techniques best suited to them and their bike, its all a matter of getting a feel for it. After some practice you'll get a feel for the best combination involving gearing down and front/back brake.


    - If you ride often on the same road, never let yourself get used to any non stationary objects that are always there. If you allow yourself to get used to seeing something on the side of the road, then chances are your going to freak out when your just about to pass it and it moves out in front of you. As often as you may see it in one place, always be looking for it in another. Staying prepared for even the most unexpected is a good way to stay upright.

    Pat
    (sorry for the long winded explanations, i may of explained some things twice in there, but out of all my get offs that one is one of the most influential in my learning so i wanted to get it out there.)
     
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  13. jrad
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    Yeh, I'd agree, I'm right :haha :haha

    all jokes aside though.......

    As you say, it's a tool in your belt to help stay alive but ultimately it won't save your life when push turns to shove so paying attention, watching every driver around you like a hawk, being ready for anything and having an option 'out' at ALL times will help ya stay outta trouble for the most part....ya can't help dumb luck sometimes like a 'roo jumping out to inspect your front wheel closer (I hear the RTA's idea for the Roo cull was instead to use them as Public Servants and inspect motorcycles in general.... :haha )

    Though I will say that if it's REALLY come to crunch time maybe you haven't given yourself a suitable option out.?? (but then see above re: Ms Dumb Luck, she's a real biatch) So then you could argue, after giving yourself options 'out's that such evasive action should not be needed all that often.....?

    In fact I actually agree with you on the main point as far as ALWAYS taking evasive action even if overkill, reason being is that alot of ppl, after going through the whole license jig (esp those new to bikes full stop) won't continue to practice these maneouvers (SP LOL I need to practice spelling!) until they need to rely on taking evasive action and it's all too late.....Always swerving, accelerating, braking (all the whilst watching ya mirrors) can help ya that bit more with the early/late encounter with the RTA-Roo 'scenario'. . . .

    Hey we agreed on something! We rock!!! :rockon

    hahahaha

    edit: On the whole safety issue we're all aware how much good gear can make a difference to comfort, crash protection blah blah > so forgive me for swearing yesterday morning when a lady arrived at work on her scooter......*yeh big deal I know*....... BUT she was looking SO good in her 'Safety Skirt/Stockings combo'........

    Unbelievable. I could say so much more but you all get the idea......The high heels merely added to the overall picture. My god . . . :crazy
     
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  14. adr1an
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    adr1an <font style="color:red;">Administrator</font> Administrator

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    Yup - pretty much covers it jrad. And yes... Scooter Fashions can be.,... interesting... ;)

    Thanks Pat, Mick, Nerf et al for sharing. Actually quite a good collection of stuff in here already - excepting my hideously long essay with no seeming point... but as I said.. screw it - I'd typed it anyway by that stage... ;)

    Keep it coming... and if anyone else has input interms of what we raise like Jrad did - throw it in...
     
    #14
  15. MickLC
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    MickLC Member

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    I'm also working on a recent one that Gos witnessed...just making sure what I type doesn't make me look like a complete idiot...50% idiot, 50% legend is the target :beg:
     
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  16. adr1an
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    adr1an <font style="color:red;">Administrator</font> Administrator

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    :lol :lol Trust me... well aware that can be a fine target to hit ;)
     
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  17. 2ndclasscitizen
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    2ndclasscitizen Member Veteran Member

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    Real Name:
    Mitch
    Bikes:
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    Scenario:
    Blinded by sun approaching curve

    Techniques Applied:
    Rampant stupidity

    Location:
    Garroorigang Rd, Goulburn

    Weather:
    Fairly clear, late May afternoon

    Description:
    Was heading home from a day spectating at Wakefield around 4.30pm. Rounded a right-hand bend approaching a large railway bank and a bridge, with another right-hand bend with a large bank behind it. As I took the right-hander under the bridge, I copped a face-full of setting sun and was basically blinded. After a long day, I instinctively shut my eyes, dropped my head and let off the throttle. Problem was, there was another right-hander to take, but I still couldn't see. So I tried to slow and stop so I could then move through the right. But, suddenly....

    [​IMG]

    Bike wound up in the ditch, and time for my second mistake. With the adrenalin up, I dragged the bike up and out of the ditch and clean lifted it up on to the wheels, which meant I re-injured my wrecked rotator cuff.

    Lessons Learned or Re-affirmed:

    Keep your fucking eyes open! And, unless it's pissing out fuel and about to ctach fire or somewhere dangerous, leave the bike where it is until you can get someone to help you pull it out.
     
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  18. MickLC
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    MickLC Member

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    On the plus side Mitch, at least you could give the crew at the track a ring and they could swing past and pick your bike up with one of the trailers :up
     
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  19. MickLC
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    MickLC Member

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    Let me know how you think I went ;-) .....


    Scenario: Finding yourself on the wrong line in a tightening radius corner and headed towards disaster.


    Techniques Applied: Look where you want to go, not where you don't. Tip it in and don't panic brake. Always leave something in reserve.


    Location: Somewhere between Bruthen and Omeo.


    Weather: Clear, sunny


    Description: We were enjoying a nice run back from the Supers, I'd just gotten past Gos on a bit of a straight and was looking to slowly try to catch up to some other riders that had pulled a bit of a gap. Came into a blind left hand hairpin at what I thought was a good speed, nice approach and line. Going around the corner it became obvious that I'd forgotten this was one of the ones that tightens up and I find myself drifting towards the centerline.

    A subconcious decision in my head said "just stick to your line, let it drift over the centerline a bit, then pull it back....there hasn't been anything else coming the other way for a while, we'll be right".

    I needed to give my subconcious a kick in the nuts for that one because as I continued around the corner and went over the centerline, a huge chrome grill attached to an even huger farkoff-fully-loaded-logging-truck appeared, coming straight at me.

    Luckily my subconcious wasn't too busy nursing it's tender bits after that kick for its first stupid decision and it redeemed itself with a smart decision of "I think we should tip it in a bit for a tighter line, aim for that spot over there and use a bit more throttle while we are at it".

    Because I wasn't riding at 100% I had enough in reserve to pull it off. The result was that I missed the truck, didn't fall off or run off the road, popped a little wheelie and managed to get home safe and sound.

    On the whole 1,939km trip that was the only time I had anything even close to a scare, I had two witnesses behind me who saw the whole thing, and I didn't have the camera running at the time. When we pulled up a little while later I had mixed emotions, half of me was kicking myself for being so stupid as to run over the white line (something I always try to avoid), while the other half was absolutely chuffed that I successfully reacted the right way (after previous occasions over the years where I haven't).

    Lessons Learned or Re-affirmed: What I consider one of the hardest things for a rider to do when presented with a situation where they are running wider than planned and are heading towards something they don't want to hit, whether it's oncoming vehicles on a left-hander or the gravel on the side of the road on a right-hander, and that is to:

    -Not target-fixate. Look where you want to go, not at what you are trying to avoid.
    -Not hit the anchors, not back off and not stand the bike up.
    -Trust that your bike can turn a bit tighter, tip it in and apply some throttle.

    and of course:

    -Always leave something in reserve on the road.
    -Always stick to your lane unless you are 100% safe not to.

    I've seen a lot of inexperiened riders, as well as quite a few experienced riders, who have reacted in the wrong way. It's a difficult lesson to learn but let my willingness to share the bits I'm not proud of be an indication of how important I think the lesson is :up
     
    #19
  20. adr1an
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    adr1an <font style="color:red;">Administrator</font> Administrator

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    Mick: I think you scored very well and got that 50/50 mix sorted ;)
    And better still, only you and your Dry Cleaner know how scared you really got right ? ;)

    It does take a long while to defeat those Panic reactions on the bike - 99% of which are all the opposite of what you actually need to do in those situations ... (speed up when you brain says slow down, tip in tighter when the brain says "too fast", dont keep an eye on that big scary thing coming at you Fast....) Its also amazing just how important that "look where you want to go" thing is... which is why looking "through" the corners is always massively important rather than just staring at the Apex.

    It stil constantly amazes me how much of our "physical" sport is governed entirely by the "mental" aspect of it...
     
    #20
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