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Starter Bike

Discussion in 'Learner League' started by Odd-i, Dec 19, 2016.

  1. Odd-i
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    Odd-i New Member

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    Hi Guys,

    I was hoping to get a little bit of advice regarding what type of bike I should buy, I'm about 180cm, carrying around about 110kg. I've been looking at the all the 'common' learner bikes ie. CBR500R, Ninja's, MT03 etc.

    But I don't really want to drop alot of money into motorbiking just yet, particularly given if I enjoy it I'll likely be looking to drop alot of money into a bigger bike after the restrictions expire. In addition, most of the riding i'll be doing at least initially will likely only be short commuting/city riding.

    With this in mind, the GN250 popped up and piqued my interest - mainly because of the prices some of the older models are going for (as low as 1k). I realise it won't be much faster than my bicycle having to haul me around but I think it'd be a very easy bike to learn on until I can move to a bigger bike.

    What does CR think about the GN250? Are there viable alternatives out there I should be looking at? Noting I probably dont want to spend too much more than 1.5k

    If I was to go have a look at a GN250, what should I be looking out for?
    I understand the start cold/check for smoke blue/black/white is a good test for older bikes.

    The one I'm looking at the moment has a RWC but it appears relatively cheap and im cautious with the old 'if it seems to good to be true' adage in mind.

    Really appreciate any advice/help

    Thanks!
     
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  2. QuikStop
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    QuikStop Member

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    Anything under 300cc will net you cheap rego, if that helps your cause. As for older bikes, I had an 84 GPZ250 and it was a cracker, lots of character, cheap insurance and all. If you like the old style looks then it's a possibility but to be honest given your size you will find the performance anaemic at best! If you can shell out the quid then get a bigger bike, the pro's are - performance, longevity, modern (better maintenance schedules, lower fuel consumption) and perhaps facilitate a smoother transition to a larger bike later. You could do a search on this forum as this question has been asked many a time, otherwise just bite the bullet, you'll learn far more in the process of making your own decisions... happy riding!
     
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  3. Lurch
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    Lurch Capt. Sense of Direction Administrator

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    Ive riden a GN250 and I can honestly describe it as the motorcycling equivalent to valium.
    Just terrible.
    Motocentral in Mitchell have a nice little Ninja300 that might be worth looking at.
     
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  4. Malcolm Chalmers
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    Malcolm Chalmers Member

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    Have a look at some of the Hyosung bikes.
    You can usually pick them up cheaply, even the 650cc ones.
    And if you go for one of the 250's it will still feel almost like a full size bike, in size anyway.
     
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  5. plankton
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    plankton New Member

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    Old zz-r250 can be had for under $2000 and pretty bulletproof. Did me for a year 6ft 90kg.
     
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  6. Jimmc
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    Jimmc Member

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    One of the hardest decisions, but don't go past the Adventure styled bikes or Trail bikes. A lot of LAMS in those you can get 650s so although they are mostly rev restricted they still have the low down grunt that would help to enjoy it once you get used to the bike. Also I find the taller suspension more forgiving and without expensive fairings the odd drop doesn't hurt them or cost you, but as said before, rego is full price over 300cc.
     
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  7. Lurch
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    Lurch Capt. Sense of Direction Administrator

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  8. Richo
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    Richo QBN's Next Top Model Veteran Member

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    Sold - Suzuki M109R L.E. Ducati Diavel Cromo
    If you have the cash, have a look at a GS500.

    You will buy one around $2500-3500 and sell it in 12 months for pretty much the same money and will get you around a bit better.

    Enjoy the ride :)
     
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  9. arson14
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    arson14 Gir Why is there bacon in the soap? Staff Member Moderator

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    gs500, ER5, vt250 spada or a hyosung gt650s. these are where i would be looking, the gs500/ER5 are bullet proof and have been around for over 20 years before they were updated and they are a do it all bike, commute, tour, sunday blast through the cotter (albeit not as exciting as the latest and greatest big bikes). Both these bikes are a swiss army knife of bikes they do a little bit of everything and can take larger riders. I have had an ER5 up to 195 (on a track of course ;) ) and they teach you how to ride and work on bikes relatively easily. Spada 250. Any 250 cc bike will fall short in torque which is more important than power commuting but these old bikes pull hard being a Vtwin and the older spadas have a 6 speed gearbox, they are harder to find but are very cool bikes and alot of fun. If you can look past the badge for a moment the old carbie model GT650s is at heart a cousin to the SV650, its a Vtwin engine and has the size to be able to tour and commute on a lot easier. the carbie ones are restricted with a simple screw in the carb slide plate very easy to bypass and they are stupid cheap to buy. yes its a korean brand but you still get a lot of bike for your money. now these bikes are most likely going to be out of your budget unless you find one that needs a bit of work, try and wait it out until your budget can stretch to a bike that doesn't need a lot of work and don't be worried about a few scratches as most learner bikes get dropped at some point. Thats my 2c anyways.
     
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  10. Miggzie
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    Miggzie Member

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    Old school 250s are great fun to hoon around on, still kinda fast if you push em, they reward good lines & technique

    A good thing to keep in mind with a L's bike is how heavy & how high it holds its weight
    you're not a small lad by the sounds of it but ive seen bigger guys fail the P-test on heavy 650's (more practice & skill is requied)
     
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  11. GTiRolla
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    GTiRolla Member

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    I'm a little biased owning a GS500, but for the size of rider you can't really go wrong (I've had mine for 2.5 years) - Even though I'm currently upgrading, I'm going to miss riding it (Hopefully passing it onto the missus), as it's very forgiving bike. The only thing bad with them is the soft front suspension, but if you can find one with stiffer springs in the front you can't go wrong esp for the price range.

    But for your size, I'd honestly steer clear of anything under 300cc, esp if you want to do anything around the 100+ speed limit :19.gif: unless you really have to have the cheap rego... (buy ear plugs!)
     
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