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Macro Newest to the collection

Discussion in 'Show your photos' started by Lurch, Mar 4, 2013.

  1. Lurch
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    Lurch Capt. Sense of Direction Administrator

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    This is the latest addition to the vintage camera collection

    It's kinda cute!
    [​IMG]
    IMGP8372.jpg by Mr Lurch, on Flickr
     
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  2. adrian1
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    Never seen the Brownie flash attachment before....can you cook pies in it?:p
     
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    You planning on using it?

    I was reading that you can just squeeze 120mm film into it.....

    Not that I'm trying to teach you how to suck eggs, but....

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3TnTWFlOos

    Looks like fun anyway :)
     
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  4. supamodel
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    supamodel Secret Aaaaaagent Man Staff Member Moderator Supporter

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    One question: any reason you shoot with the 20-40? For these kinds of product shots, I prefer a longer focal length to to a shorter one. e.g. (the lighting sucks in this one, but it was 2 minutes with my light tent so I didn't put in much effort) http://www.wenga.net/ellingly/cacycleworks_order_1200.jpg is actually using my 105 macro lens.
     
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  5. Lurch
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    Lurch Capt. Sense of Direction Administrator

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    Primarily space. My office is so full of crap, I cant sit that far back from the subject.
    And the 20-40 is the lens that just "lives" on camera; and I'm really lazy.
     
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  6. Someguy
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    Someguy Super Elite Awesome Member Supporter

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    Not that anyone asked... but...

    I would stick with the 20-40mm for things like this. It's gives a perspective pretty similar to the naked eye when used on a crop sensor camera like the Pentax K-5. Longer lenses will compress things a bit unnaturally and I'm not a fan of the semi-isometric look that can occur when shooting longer lenses with a large DOF on subjects like these.
     
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  7. supamodel
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    supamodel Secret Aaaaaagent Man Staff Member Moderator Supporter

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    I asked cause it looks a bit long in the back. 30mm or so is going to be normal, shorter than that will distort in the opposite way to going too long. Plus the distortion by going 10 mm too short (e.g. 30->20mm) is going to be similar in the opposite direction to a lot further length wise :).
     
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  8. Lurch
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    Lurch Capt. Sense of Direction Administrator

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    On a crop sensor; as far as I know 35mm is the equivalent(ish) to the 50mm everyone used on FF film cameras and were considered the focal length 'as the eye would see it'.
    I have considered getting a 35mm prime; however the Sigma 20-40 takes such a nice photo and give me that little bit of extra flexibility that I cant really justify it.
    In saying that tho; a lot of people do use 90-105mm for most macro work.
    But again; I just dont have the space to sit back that far. And also I'm more than happy with the results Ive been getting; especially since I built my $10 lightbox last night.
     
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  9. Someguy
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    Someguy Super Elite Awesome Member Supporter

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    True. Even a difference of only 1 or 2mm when you're really wide can make a massive difference. I used a 12-24mm once of a full frame camera. It was incredible but you had to be really careful of where you set up because you were likely to get your feet in the frame, even when angled upwards! :p

    20mm on an APS-C sensor is roughly the same as 35mm full frame, which is pretty close to how we see. I think if it were measurable, the focal length of the eye would be close to 40-43mm. So even at the widest Lurch's lens should be able to avoid undesirable/unnatural (compared to the human eye) distortion. A lot of street photographers shoot with both 35mm and 50mm on full frame cameras to simulate the feeling of "being there" - because the characteristics are so close to the human eye. When DSLRs first took off, the old Canon EF 20mm was a popular lens, despite not being designed for DSLRs, because putting it on those old crop sensors could get the 35mm look.

    Am I just ranting now? Probably. But I love a good photography rant :)

    Either way... I actually like the pic a lot, Lurch. The lighting is a lot more subtle than the last pic you posted and does justice to the age of the subject. Nicely done. I'd probably 'shop out the lighter though :D
     
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  10. Lurch
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    Lurch Capt. Sense of Direction Administrator

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    I actually did; but put the 'lighter' one up to give the little champ some sense of scale

    [​IMG]
    IMGP8368.jpg by Mr Lurch, on Flickr
     
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  11. supamodel
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    Normal (~equiv to the eye's perspective) is a focal length the same as the diagonal of the image on the sensor/film plane. So, for 35mm film (24x36mm) it's 42mm. 50s were just cheaper to produce and a nice round number, hence the prevalance of nifty fifties for 35mm/'full frame' sensors. APS-C is (off the top of my head) 25x17mm, giving a normal of 30mm.

    Normal on a large format, e.g. 6"x4", is ~180mm for comparison. Which is why if you want wiiiiiiiiddddeeeeeeee, 'full-frame' is hardly full frame :).

    Yes, getting off topic, but normal and what is wide and what is tele is important for understanding the effect of focal length on perspective. Less than normal (wide) and you accentuate distance away and towards the camera, and greater than normal (tele) you compress distance away and towards the camera.

    EDIT: That's for perspective, in one vision we can see much wider than 'normal' is going to, because we have far wider vision than cameras have.
     
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  12. Someguy
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    12mm on a FF is plenty wide enough!! :D I was astounded by that lens. Pretty amazing visuals but super limited application. Not once have I ever found myself needing anything that wide for a client. I'd still like to have one, though.
     
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  13. supamodel
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    supamodel Secret Aaaaaagent Man Staff Member Moderator Supporter

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    It's also about the flexibility you get. 12mm on 35mm(1) is ~50mm on 6x4". So whereas you have 12 to 40mm practically for wide lenses on 35mm, you've got 50mm to 180mm. And, as I said earlier, the wider you get, the more each mm step has :).


    (1) having shot larger formats than 35mm, I resent the idea that it is full frame. Bit like the stupid USB speed naming speed, ok so it's full frame, this is ULTRA FRAME or something.
     
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  14. Someguy
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    I suspect that 35mm is "full frame" because it was without doubt the most common film size, and needed to be distinguished from APS-C and the other sensors that came out with DSLRs in direct competition.

    You certainly do have the extra flexibility with a sensor size/focal range like that. But good luck getting a zoom lens with a comparable range for a large format camera! I doubt there would be any point because you'd probably need to buy multiple primes which would still afford you less flexibility than a single a 12-24 zoom on a 35mm...? We found a place in Japan that stocked a massive range of medium/large format camera lenses when I was there last time, but you'd need to mortgage a house to afford them! :eek:
     
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  15. Someguy
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    Also... I read your earlier post as 6x4 (like 645 medium format) and was struggling to figure out how you arrived at a diagonal of 180mm! haha. I spent a good couple of minutes scratching my head before I realised you said 6 x 4 INCHES! lol.
     
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  16. supamodel
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    supamodel Secret Aaaaaagent Man Staff Member Moderator Supporter

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    Yeah 645 is medium format, large format is like 6x4" :).

    (As for the zoom argument, it depends what you're shooting as to if you actually want such a zoom. The majority of product shots are done with a single focal length, so a zoom is a moot point. Full-frame came about because it's a selling point "you can use all of your old 35mm lenses", regardless of any arguments regarding smaller formats having their places, too. 35mm became common mainly cause the film was cheap, and then economies of scale made it even cheaper).

    Anyway, if the only criticism is about perspective, and we have two differing opinions, it's a good shot :).
     
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  17. Someguy
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    I've been wanting a 645 for a while now, actually. Just for fun, and also because I love film :) I keep eyeing them off on allclassifieds but haven't pulled the trigger yet.
     
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  18. supamodel
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    supamodel Secret Aaaaaagent Man Staff Member Moderator Supporter

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    Do it, so I can borrow it like I used to do to a friend who I lived back in Hobart. Don't have access to any medium format at the moment, and it's a lovely format to shoot.
     
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  19. Lurch
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    Lurch Capt. Sense of Direction Administrator

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    I'd love a Pentax 645D :D
     
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